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"Artists make things in response to the spiritual, mental, emotional vibrations that are all around them. And the end result is art."

- benCaldwell.

We are explorers and treasure hunters of our natural world, rummaging through creek beds, roadsides, and rubbish bins to rescue things left behind. Our goal is to promote sustainability through reclaiming and repurposing found objects and leftover materials that would otherwise be discarded.  With a little inventiveness, anything can be giving new purpose.  Our products range from personal accessories to home accents and are pieced together from both natural and manmade remnants including fossils, animal bones, window glass, soda cans, and salvaged textiles. As lifelong learners of the natural world and forgotten crafts, our fruits are constantly evolving.  Our mission is to encourage creativity and invention, resourcefulness, and respect for the environment.  


2015 — planter and bowl, made entirely of plastic bags.

2015 — planter and bowl, made entirely of plastic bags.

Repurposed materials ::

Although considered an integrated component of the environment, humans can be an unnatural, external, and often destructive force on natural ecosystems. Through the continuation of non-sustainable practices, anthropogenic influences significantly impact all ecosystems on Earth as resources are continuously consumed and rarely replenished. Reducing, reusing, and recycling are three methods that we can apply to help us be mindful of our ecosystem footprint. With a little imagination, recyclable materials can be repurposed into practical and fashionable items. 

2016 - handmade beeswax candles filling used cat food tins and decoupaged with NatGeo cuttings. shown with basket made of plastic packaging.

2016 - handmade beeswax candles filling used cat food tins and decoupaged with NatGeo cuttings. shown with basket made of plastic packaging.


2016 - bolo made from broken mirror, deerskin, and cut soda can. 

2016 - bolo made from broken mirror, deerskin, and cut soda can. 

Mirrors ::

The mirror is a form of esoteric symbolism that alludes to the higher purpose of our spiritual reflection. Our reflection demonstrates the consequences that our actions have brought upon us and shows us everything in our life that we have created for ourselves. In order for us to honestly evaluate ourselves and the world we have created around us, we must view our current reflection with an enlightened mind. Whatever we view in our personal spiritual mirror is currently the truth of the world with which we have created around ourselves. Use this piece to remind yourself (and others) that the mirror simply reflects truth and honesty. Be true to yourself and to your surroundings.  


2014 — Copper. Turtle bones. Thread.

2014 — Copper. Turtle bones. Thread.

Nature treasures ::

As inhabitants of this earth, nature continues to surprise us. Relics of living plants and animals, as well as non-living matter- whether preserved, transformed, or novel, are all products of this earth that should be treasured and preserved. Nature brings out the best in us- we create one of a kind pieces to remind the wearer of the importance of our natural world.  

2015 - bolo backsides. creek finds paired with cut soda cans.

2015 - bolo backsides. creek finds paired with cut soda cans.


2015 - a row of crinoids soldered like snaggle teeth along a subirrigated planter made from a repurposed jug.

2015 - a row of crinoids soldered like snaggle teeth along a subirrigated planter made from a repurposed jug.

Crinoids ::

One of the few existing “living fossils,” crinoids are an extant group that date back as early as the Ordovician period.  Relatives of the echinoderms (starfish, sea urchins and sand dollars to name a few), crinoids resemble an underwater plant that created forests on the floor of the shallow seas at their height during the Paleozoic Era. Although most species are sessile and attach themselves to substrate, many are attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. Crinoids are a very common fossil because of their abundance during fossil formation, and are some of the oldest on the planet (~450 million years old)! The most encountered remnants are stalk fragments, or “indian money,” which are usually found in creeks throughout Tennessee. This unique item consists of ancestors of our currently living crinoid species, so we proudly utilize these remnants in support of geologic history and evolution.